A Fourth Transformation: Is Mexico Ready for Social Justice?

A Fourth Transformation: Is Mexico Ready for Social Justice?

Center for Global Justice presents
Talk
“A Fourth Transformation: Is Mexico Ready for Social Justice?”
By Hector Ulloa
Tue, Feb 25, 11am
Teatro Santa Ana
70 pesos

Film
Where Can We Live In Peace?
Wed, Feb 26, 11am
Teatro Santa Ana
70 pesos

Film
American Factory
Thu, Feb 27, 11am
Teatro Santa Ana
70 pesos

By Cliff DuRand

Hector Ulloa returns to San Miguel de Allende to address the question, “Is Mexico ready for social justice?” Mexico is in the midst of great changes. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO, for short) has pledged to end the corruption that has been endemic in the country and help the poor. These are just a couple of the more difficult aspects of what he calls The Fourth Transformation. With an activist state exercising a preferential option for the poor, he promises an end to the neoliberal era of the last 30 years. While he remains overwhelmingly popular, deep class divisions have opened up between supporters and opponents.

A year ago Judy Jackson’s film Walk With Us followed a caravan of Central American migrants moving through Mexico. They were fleeing the violence of drug gangs, extreme poverty, and climate change in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Much of the film took place at the ABBA House for migrants in Celaya where the work of the shelter’s founder Pastor Ignacio Ramirez Martinez was featured.

 Where Can We Live In Peace? returns to the migrants and to ABBA to show how much has changed in just one year. Migrants are now more stigmatized and Pastor Ignacio’s work is more difficult. The stories the migrants now tell are difficult and distressing. The Trump administration has made the asylum process at the border almost impossible for the migrants, and his threats have sadly resounded in Mexico. The result is that the aggressive migration policies now adopted by the US and Mexico leave more and more migrants trapped in a cycle of violence. Now many are asking, “Where can we live in peace?”

American Factory, the 2020 Oscar-winning documentary, is about a closed General Motors plant in Dayton, Ohio, that is now owned by a Chinese billionaire and employs American workers under Chinese authoritarian style management. It is a prescription for conflict when workers try to form a union under the impression they are more than compliant cogs in the machine but actually have rights. This is the first film to be released by Higher Ground the production company formed by Barack and Michelle Obama. It is a tale from the rust belt that is struggling with the impact of globalization.